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Things to know and do before you head to Armenia...

 SEE BELOW FOR TRAVEL TIPS TO ARGENTINA!

Current exchange rates:

483 Armenian Drams (AMD) to the US dollar

541 AMD to the Euro

630 AMD to the British Pound Sterling

30 AMD to the Argentine Peso

 

Travel:  You can fly to Armenia thru Paris, Vienna, Warsaw, Moscow, Kiev, Tblisi, Tehran, St Petersburg, Sochi, Beirut, Istanbul,  Dubai, Athens, and other cool places!

 

Visas:  The Ministry of Foreign Affairs website, www.mfa.am/en  posts information about travel to Armenia including visa information:

http://www.mfa.am/en/visa/

and a list of countries whose travelers may enter Armenia without a visa:  

http://www.mfa.am/u_files/file/consulate/Visa/visafreelisteng2.pdf

 

The US State Department website also lists useful travel info for Armenia

 

 

For travel to the 12th Armenian Medical World Congress in Argentina, 2017

If you are a  Australian or Canadian citizen, you will need to pay a reciprocity fee before you enter Argentina. This fee may vary depending on your nationality.  For US passport holders, the fee is no longer required.

see www.provinciapagos.com.ar and www.migraciones.gov.ar

Health and Safety:

 

Preventive Vaccines: Make sure you are up to date with all US- recommended routine age-appropriate vaccines. For vaccines to be effective, they must be given at least 2 weeks before travel, thus planning ahead is important.

Hepatitis A vaccine: recommended for all travelers ages 1 year and above. If you did not receive 2 doses as a child, AND if you have no proof of immunity (by blood testing),please receive the vaccine prior to travel.

MMR vaccine (measles, mumps, rubella): 2 doses are recommended, as long as there are 4 weeks between the 1st and 2nd doses. 

Tdap vaccine (whooping cough and tetanus booster): recommended for all travelers ages 10 years and above, AND if you have not received one as an adult or in the last 10 years.

Influenza vaccine: recommended for all travelers ages 6 months and above. Although flu season in the US is almost over, the season is just starting in Argentina; if you did not receive your flu shot this season, please receive it prior to travel.

Yellow fever vaccine: recommended for all travelers ages 9 months and above, IF AND ONLY IF you are touring the BRAZILIAN side of Iguazu National Park. Contact your local travel clinic to receive this vaccine as it is available only in designated travel clinics (feel free to contact the AAHPO hotline or email for further information). The vaccine is contraindicated in those with a compromised immune system.

 

Preventing Mosquito BitesZika and other viruses can be transmitted by mosquitoes in Argentina. To avoid mosquito bites, please take with you and use insect repellent, preferably containing DEET 25-45%.  Pregnant women or women trying to get pregnant need to avoid mosquito bites at all cost. Yellow fever virus is also transmitted by mosquitoes, thus use repellent generously in the Iguazu Park.

 

Sunscreen: Apply generously and frequently. Apply sunscreen prior to applying insect repellents.

 

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT): Travelers on long plane rides are at risk for developing DVT, which are blood clots in the deep veins of your legs because you are sitting still in a confined space for long periods of time. The risk is elevated for travelers over age 60 and for pregnant women. So move your legs frequently on the airplane and exercise your calf muscles to improve the flow of blood. Take a break from sitting to stretch your legs. Extend your legs straight out and flex your ankles (pulling your toes toward you). Some airlines suggest pulling each knee up toward the chest and holding it there with your hands on your lower leg for 15 seconds, and repeat up to 10 times. Consult your physician before you travel to see if you need additional medication to prevent DVT.

 

 

Traveler's diarrhea: Usually manifests with a sudden onset of bothersome symptoms that can range from mild cramps and urgent loose stools, to severe abdominal pain, fever, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea. For the prevention of both this and any other food-borne illness, strict hand hygiene with soap and water is important, including taking with you pocket-size hand sanitizer gels. When possible, drink bottled or carbonated beverages; alternatively, boil tap water for 3-5 minutes, store in clean containers and use for consumption. Make sure the food you consume is very well-cooked, avoid "adventurous" eating. Take some prepackaged snacks with you. In cases of mild dehydration, Gatorade-type liquids are preferred because they contain both salt and sugar. Pepto-Bismol may also be used as adjunctive treatment, if one is not allergic to aspirin and if one has no fever. Avoid Imodium, and do not accept unproven remedies such as enemas and the like.

 

Tuberculosis (TB): The risk of acquiring TB is generally low for most tourist travelers. Our Medical Mission participants anticipating possible prolonged exposure to TB environments, such as working in hospitals with known or suspected TB patients, should ensure they have appropriate masks to use while working, and should get tested for exposure after return from Armenia.

 

Have a great trip, be careful when crossing the street.

 

 

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